Finished Pages #2 – August Challenge Part 1

Hello everyone! Today I want to talk about the first three books I finished for my book challenge in August! I had set myself the challenge of reading 20 books…but I only got to read 13, some of which were different from what I had originally planned in my August Challenge post. But alas! That is better than not reading any books so let’s get to the reviews!! 🙂

1. Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie (Goodreads)
Goodreads rating – 4.14 out of 5 stars
My rating – 4 out of 5 stars
SUMMARY: One of Agatha Christie’s most famous mysteries, Murder on the Orient Express was inspired by two real-life crimes and the author’s own experience being stranded on the Orient Express during Christmas of 1931. While traveling to Paris, a wealthy American is stabbed to death in his cabin on the Orient Express. With the train stuck in a snowdrift, there is no easy escape for the killer. Fortunately, detective Hercule Poirot is aboard and launches a clever investigation into the curious assortment of passengers, of whom each seems to have a motive.
REVIEW: This was my first time reading an Agatha Christie book and I really enjoy her descriptive writing style. The window into life in the 1930’s was very interesting and I did not see the outcome of the mystery coming AT ALL. Very impressed 🙂 If you haven’t read any Agatha Christie novels I would recommend starting here.

2. The Cartoon Introduction to Economics: Volume Two: Macroeconomics by Yoram Bauman and Grady Klein (Goodreads)
Goodreads Rating: 4.06 out of 5 stars
My Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
SUMMARY: Need to understand today’s economy? This is the book for you. The Cartoon Introduction to Economics, Volume Two: Macroeconomics is the most accessible, intelligible, and humorous introduction to unemployment, inflation, and debt you’ll ever read.Whereas Volume One: Microeconomics dealt with the optimizing individual, Volume Two: Macroeconomics explains the factors that affect the economy of an entire country, and indeed the planet. It explores the two big concerns of macroeconomics: how economies grow and why economies collapse. It illustrates the basics of the labor market and explains what the GDP is and what it measures, as well as the influence of government, trade, and technology on the economy. Along the way, it covers the economics of global poverty, climate change, and the business cycle. In short, if any of these topics have cropped up in a news story and caused you to wish you grasped the underlying basics, buy this book.
REVIEW: Long story short, loved this book as much as the first volume. Still informational with a side of humor 🙂

3. The Canterbury Tales by Chaucer (Goodreads)
Goodreads Rating: 3.46 out of 5 stars
My Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
SUMMARY: The procession that crosses Chaucer’s pages is as full of life and as richly textured as a medieval tapestry. The Knight, the Miller, the Friar, the Squire, the Prioress, the Wife of Bath, and others who make up the cast of characters — including Chaucer himself — are real people, with human emotions and weaknesses. When it is remembered that Chaucer wrote in English at a time when Latin was the standard literary language across western Europe, the magnitude of his achievement is even more remarkable. But Chaucer’s genius needs no historical introduction; it bursts forth from every page of The Canterbury Tales.
REVIEW: It took me a little while to get back into the flow of this book but I really enjoyed it. I read the Canterbury Tales in high school and did a film project incorporating some of the characters, so it was fun to reread and remember how crazy that whole project was. The Wife of Bath and the Miller are my two favorite stories. The Canterbury Tales can be over loquacious at times and some of the tales aren’t as interesting, but there are some true gems.

Hope you enjoyed the reviews! Let me know in the comments below if you have read any of these! Also what did you read in August that you think I would enjoy? 🙂

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Book Review – Nowhere to Turn by Lynette Eason

*peeks out from behind the curtain* Hi everyone! Sorry it has been ages since my last post. August turned into a bit of a blackhole between work and illness. But I am back now! Kicking things off with a review of a book that was sent to me for honest review from  Baker Group Publishing.

Nowhere to Turn

DESCRIPTION (No spoilers):
The day Danielle Harding takes her 11-year-old son, Simon, and flees from her abusive husband, is the same day Kurt Harding dies. A relieved Dani believes she and her son are finally safe–but in reality, the danger has just begun. When Kurt was alive, he took something important to a mysterious person. That person wants the item back and believes Dani now has it. As she and her son run for their lives, they have nowhere to turn, until she hires Adam Buchanan of Operation Refuge and goes into hiding. Unfortunately, she won’t be able to hide for long . . .

RATING – 1 out of 5 stars

REVIEW:
I just can’t seem to get into this book. I gave it the 100 page test but I just find myself smacking the book against my head and not really liking the characters. There is so much going on in this book that I found myself getting more and more annoyed with each plot twist rather than gripping the book and wanting to continue on. The main character Dani is likable enough and I do want to see her get safely out of the hell hole that is her life, but there is Stuart, her scary, stalker brother-in-law and he is one of main reasons why I can’t seem to enjoy this book. I understand that he is the main “villain” right now but I read more about him and his plan and it makes me not want to read anymore because I just get frustrated and annoyed with him. Is Stuart also the mysterious individual that Kurt took something important from? I don’t know…that section of the plot has yet to really open up. This mystery thriller is still stuck in the RUN AWAY phase and I have lost interest in waiting for it to turn into the FIGURE IT OUT phase.